Undergraduate Courses

Requirements


Lower Division
(one required): Each of these classes introduces students to the use of digital tools and methodologies to examine complex cultural, social, and historical dynamics. Minors are strongly encouraged to take either INF STD 20 or 30. See the master list for the full list of options.

Upper Division: In addition to the Lower Division course, Minors need to take:

      1. DH 101
      2. One upper division course, DH 110 – 160, and
      3. Three other upper-division electives, which may be other DH courses. See the master list for the full list of options.

Capstone:Minors must also take either DH 187 (capstone seminar) or DH 198/199 (small research group or independent study).

Course Codes:

    • DH 110: User Experience Design
    • DH 120: Social Media Data Analytics
    • DH 125: Data Analysis for Social and Cultural Research
    • DH 131: Digital Mapping and Critical Geographic Information Systems
    • DH 140: Programming for Humanists
    • DH M145: Text Analysis
    • DH 150/151: Special topics
    • DH 187: Capstone seminar

Course Petitions

Please fill out this form if you’d like to petition for an elective. Include all the information you can, including a syllabus, if available. Petitions will be reviewed at least once per quarter. Please email Kerry Allen if you have additional questions.

How to register for a DH 199 course:

    1. Identify a capstone course (see below for upcoming courses)
    2. Contact the professor who is offering the course to express your interest and ask if they have room. If not, repeat step 1. If they do:
    3. Fill out a course contract on My UCLAEach online contract form is customized for a specific course number. Before filling out the form, the student should prepare a short description of the proposed course of study, nature of faculty supervision, and type of tangible evidence of work completed to be presented at the course conclusion. The form provides instructions for completion, printing, signatures, and further steps.
    4. Email the completed course contract to your 199 professor and our SAO, Kerry Allen, allen@humnet.ucla.edu.

That’s it! Your professor will confirm via email that they have approved your enrollment in their 199, and Kerry will finalize your registration.

Questions?

Contact our SAO, Kerry Allen at allen@humnet.ucla.edu

 


Summer Course Registration is Live

 

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Big Data for Social Justice: Information and RegistrationThe Big Data for Justice Summer Institute is an innovative four-week program designed to develop student’s abilities to critique, analyze, visualize and map big data using Tableau, GIS methods, and other digital technologies. The course emphasizes project-based learning and consists of a series of skill-building workshops and educational seminars as well as fieldwork and lab/studio time focused on issues around criminal justice in Los Angeles. Students will collaborate with community partners to conduct analyses consistent with current on-the-ground advocacy work using data on arrests by the Los Angeles Police Department. (See link above for more information.)

DH 101: Introduction to Digital Humanities

Summer Session C

This course is an introduction to the Digital Humanities, its methods, theories, and applications in humanistic research. It covers a variety of digital tools and approaches to organize, explore, understand, present and tell stories with data. In this course, you will learn how to reverse engineer DH projects to understand how they were built; identify, use, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different tools and methodologies; develop strong humanistic research questions that can be answered through digital research methods; conduct original research; and build a collaborative digital project. You will also learn how to organize and clean data, develop charts, create spatial and network visualizations, work with a content management system, and use basic text analysis tools to explore qualitative data. Often the best digital humanities projects are the result of collaboration, so you will learn how to work effectively and efficiently in teams as you build project management skills. Each unit will guide you through the development, analysis, and application of the skills listed under the course learning goals. In each unit, you will also critique examples of research projects that employ the methods and/or tools that you are learning.

This class will have due dates three times a week to help you keep up with readings, assignments, and project milestones. You will meet once a week synchronously with the course instructor in a whole class learning experience and once a week with your smaller lab sections; additional group work outside of the allocated class time will be necessary. We will discuss ways to organize collaborative work, as well as ways to stay on track through virtual simultaneous and asynchronous group work. No prior experience is necessary, and there are no prerequisites.

See Summer 2021 Syllabus and Past Student Projects

Register Today!

Spring 2022

  • DH 101: Introduction to Digital Humanities

    Instructor: Francesca Albrezzi

    Schedule: Lectures – Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:00pm-3:15pm / Labs – Fridays, 1A & 1B: 9:30am-10:45am; 1C & 1D: 11:00am-12:15pm

    Location: Lecture Location: Haines Hall 118 and Zoom / Lab Locations: 1A: Bunche Hall 3178; 1B: Royce Hall 160; 1C: Haines Hall A44; 1D: Bunche Hall 3170

    Increasingly, we access, share, and create information in digital forms. How does – or how should – that change the way we do scholarly work? The development of the field of Digital Humanities to address the use of digital and computational methods for humanities research and publication renegotiates the standard practices of research methods and publication outcomes. In this accelerated course, we will investigate the productive tension that results from combining computational methods with humanistic inquiry, which continues to break new ground. The sources, processes, and presentation decisions that define a digital humanities project require specific parameters and functionalities depending on the subject matter and methods applied.

    This course is an introduction to the Digital Humanities, its methods, theories, and applications in humanistic research. It covers a variety of digital tools and approaches to organize, explore, understand, present and tell stories with data. Throughout the course, students will learn how to reverse engineer DH projects to understand how they were built; identify, use, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different tools and methodologies; develop strong humanistic research questions that can be answered through digital research methods; conduct original research; and build a collaborative digital project. Students will also learn how to organize and clean data, develop charts, create spatial and network visualizations, work with a content management system, and use basic text analysis tools to explore qualitative data. Often the best digital humanities projects are the result of collaboration, so students will learn how to work effectively and efficiently in teams as they build project management skills. Each unit will guide you through the development, analysis, and application of the skills listed under the course learning goals. In each unit, students will also critique examples of research projects that employ the methods and/or tools that they are learning.

    The course will be run in a hybrid fashion to offer flexible learning options that allow students to feel safe and make decisions on what will best serve them. No prior experience is necessary. The course’s structure and content are based on Dr. Johanna Drucker’s, Dr. Miriam Posner’s and Dr. Ashley Sanders’ DH 101 courses, which have been taught over the years at UCLA.

  • DH 110: User Experience and Design

    Instructor: Sookyung Cho

    Schedule: Wednesdays, 2pm-4:50pm PST
    Location: Kaufman 153

    This course introduces the fields of UX research and design. It covers UX design methods and process, including ethnographic field research, persona-scenario development, information architecture, prototyping, and usability testing. Students will learn by hands-on practice in a human-centered process: how to understand users, how to design interface & interaction for users, and how to evaluate and communicate user experience design with users. 

  • DH 150, sec 2: Digital Analysis Tools for Literature

    Instructor: David MacFadyen

    Schedule: online AS and Fridays, 4pm-4:50pm PST
    Location: PAB 1343A

    Examination of wide range of free and/or open-source tools that can significantly improve analysis of literature. In name of maximum accessibility and inclusion, introduction to approximately 30 pieces of software, all of which can be quickly introduced and applied. Whether one is dealing with large works of literature, corpus of multiple novels, or other dauntingly large texts from daily life, study helps everybody analyze and speak of substantial data with greater confidence. No coding expertise required; no command-line work involved.

  • DH 151: Urban Humanities

    Instructor: Yoh Kawano

    Schedule: Mondays, 2pm-4:50pm PST
    Location: Rolfe 2118

    As a digital humanist, you are at the crossroads of three simple inquiries: Where did it happen? When did it happen? Why did it happen? Space and time are forever interlinked, and the digital revolution has made it such that the visualization of the “spatial” and the “temporal” brings possibilities to interrogate, analyze, reveal, narrate and discover new dimensions that may otherwise remain dormant in its original state. In today’s Internet centered, social media frenzied society, spatial data is becoming one with the web. Twitter, Facebook, TikTok, Uber, Yelp, Google Maps, Leaflet are examples of geospatial technologies centered around the notion that “location,” “mobility,” and “time” are correlated, and they matter. Humanists are asking new questions, demanding justice from data that did not exist a decade ago, resulting in the creation of compelling web-based mapping applications that are empowering the public to become online cartographers. 

    The purpose of this course is to implement and examine such web-based technologies. Students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, design, develop and publish web-based digital mapping solutions. Students will learn how GIS on the internet differs from the desktop experience, and how to prepare spatial information for the web. Although no prior programming experience is required, the course is specifically designed to bring out the “coder” in the “non-coder,” and will teach the basics of internet programming languages. Different web technologies will be explored, including GitHub, HTML, CSS, Javascript and Leaflet. 

    It should be noted that the course is primarily a programming class. On top of the web-GIS discussion, we will cover the technical details about web servers and networks that are necessary for a solid and comprehensive understanding of web technologies and web programming in general. Students will be expected to fully code and produce a functioning interactive, database driven mapping website.

  • DH 187: Capstone Seminar: RomeLab

    Instructor: Chris Johanson

    Schedule: Tuesday, 12pm-2:50pm PST
    Location: Rolfe 2118 

    UCLA Romelab is a multi-disciplinary research group whose work uses the physical and virtual city of Rome as a point of departure to study the interrelationship between historical phenomena and the spaces and places of the ancient city. RomeLab is a unique experience that integrates the research team and research lab directly into the classroom to study the ancient city through the use of interactive, multi-player Virtual Worlds and video game technology.

  • DH 199/299: Digital Reconstructions on Broadway

    Instructor: Anthony Caldwell

    Schedule: Tuesday, 1:00pm-3:00pm PST
    Location: Scholarly Innovation Lab (in the YRL)

    This course will introduce 3-D modeling techniques and the use of augmented reality in the field of cultural heritage conservation.  

    The historic Theatres in Downtown Los Angeles are part of a rich cultural legacy that provides insight into the architectural practices of the early 20th century. This course will investigate how these monuments were constructed, decorated, and used through in-depth archival research, 3D modeling, and augmented reality (AR.) Students will identify a topic of interest and produce a 3D model, AR experience, and documentation detailing their research, procedures, and process. 

    Recommended for students with interest in 3D modeling, VR/AR, GIS, and data visualizations.

  • DH 199/299: Visualizing Recorded Jewish Music

    Instructor: Mark Kligman

    Since the late 1800s Jewish music has been commercially recorded. Because music has been an important part of the American Jewish experience, these recordings are important primary historical documents chronicling the history and development of Jewish life and culture in America. However, to date, there is no comprehensive study of the tens of thousands of recordings that exist in archives and libraries across the U.S. “Visualizing Recorded Jewish Music” seeks to integrate data from multiple sources into a single, comprehensive database of Jewish music recordings held in American archival collections, to prepare raw data for analysis, and to utilize digital tools to clean, standardize, and analyze data. 

    For the past two years, a research team based in the Herb Alpert School of Music and the Lowell Milken Center for Music of American Jewish Experience has been developing a robust data set for the purpose of analyzing and visualizing one American collection of recorded Jewish music—the Milken Archive of Jewish Music—primarily using Tableau. Additionally, the research team has acquired raw data from several archival collections and created a centralized database. We now seek to clean, streamline, and optimize our data to facilitate research and analysis. 

    Visualizing Recorded Jewish Music will expand on the research team’s current work through deepening and refining existing methodologies, as well as exploring alternate methods that will help forge new directions for research and analysis. We are seeking solutions that will allow us to work with recording collection data acquired from other archives and institutions, and additional creative solutions that will advance the field of American Jewish music studies in exciting ways.  

    Data Collection—identify raw data to capture for use 
    Data organization—format data for analysis
    Data Analysis—Thus far our primary analysis has been genre, style identifiers, and chronology, and word frequency; we are seeking additional means to analyze the textual components of these recording collections
    Data Consolidation––eliminate duplicate data and find solutions to deal with data variation and inconsistency 

    Software to use includes: Tableau, Atlas TI, Voyant

  • DH 199/299

    Instructor: Miriam Posner

    Students will develop tutorials for a range of technologies, in multiple media, for use by the DH program (and anyone else who wants to use them). They’ll learn how to write good documentation, how to anticipate and address users’ confusion, and, of course, how to use an array of tools.

  • DH 199/299: DH Holocaust Research Lab

    Instructor: Todd S. Presner

    Required Skills: Data viz (Tableau & R), Javascript code libraries (D3), or front-end web development, or Python, or Javascript, and/or HTML5 and CSS. 

    Recommended Skills:Experience with NLP or sound/voice analysis is a plus.

  • DH 199/299: Philae in 4D

    Instructor: Willeke Wendrich, Deidre Brin, and Anthony Caldwell

    Schedule: Wednesday, 2pm-4:50pm PST
    Location: Fowler A163

    This combined graduate seminar and undergraduate capstone focus on the Temple of Philae in the form of a workshop in which all participants contribute their particular subject of interest and expertise. Central is the development of a three-dimensional Virtual Reality model, created by participants of the DH199 capstone, in which we will display the temple development over time (the 4th dimension). To this model, we will link the results of individual graduate student research projects which can focus on textual, spatial, or iconographical analysis, as well as Philae in the broader context of northeast Africa, Nubia, Egyptian religion, or Temples of the Ptolemaic to Late Roman Periods.